January 18, 2019

in: Reviews

The Scarlet Ibis Alights at Longy

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Boston Opera Collaborative’s new production of Stefan Weisman’s The Scarlet Ibis to a libretto by David Cote, , continues through at Longy through Sunday with BOC’s two alternating 5-singer casts.    [continued]

January 14, 2019

in: Reviews

BSCP Honors Harbison

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In celebration of John Harbison’s 80th-birthday year, the Boston Symphony Chamber Players offered a half-century spectrum of his chamber music at Jordan Hall on Sunday, topping off the afternoon with a Bach cantata in honor of Harbison’s lifelong dedication to that repertory.    [continued]

January 13, 2019

in: Reviews

Pro Arte Displays Jewels and Gems in Newton

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Pro Arte Chamber offering of  three 19th-century works in the aptly titled “Jewels and Gems.” under Paul Polivnick gave us much to appreciate in the highly-decorated sanctuary of the First Baptist Church in Newton Centre on Saturday.    [continued]

January 12, 2019

in: Reviews

Gnarly Thursday, Delicate Friday at the Hall

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Thursday’s BSO subscription concert dispensed some intriguing repertory and interpretive choices, concluding with a cathartic reading of a popular classic, as Andrew Davis led off with a celebration of John Harbison’s 80th birthday.    [continued]

January 8, 2019

in: Reviews

BCMS Delivers a Stunner

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Boston Chamber Music Society’s concert last Sunday set such a high bar for musical camaraderie and inspired choice of repertoire that it will doubtless be counted as one of the best concerts of 2019.    [continued]

January 5, 2019

in: Reviews

BSO Redresses Neglect

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Shiyeon Sung featured Fanny Mendelssohn’s only orchestral work, one of her brother’s once-omnipresent piano concertos, and the most orotund and genial of Dvořák’s late symphonies Thursday night.    [continued]

January 1, 2019

in: Reviews

“Festive” Gala Floats on Even Keel

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While Vivaldi, Telemann, and Bach scores provided ample fodder for the virtuosic and dramatic, Boston Baroque ventured otherwise in its New Year’s Eve Gala at Sanders.    [continued]

December 22, 2018

in: Reviews

Eclectic Adventures with AMOC

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This writer’s spirit ran amok with AMOC — the American Modern Opera Company — through an afternoon of ambitiously eclectic adventures last weekend at two Harvard venues.    [continued]

December 21, 2018

in: Reviews

Faithful to Bach the Innovator

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Pianist Sergey Schepkin and violinist Robyn Bollinger brought exceptionally evocative performances of Bach’s Six Sonatas for Violin and Keyboard for Glissando at First Church Boston on Sunday.    [continued]

December 14, 2018

in: Reviews

A Joyful Baroque Christmas with H+H

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Handel and Haydn Society’s “A Baroque Christmas” notched some pretty high rankings in the celestial ether for a strong turnout of revelers at Jordan Hall Thursday. The program will be repeated Sunday, December 16, 2018 at Jordan Hall.    [continued]

December 12, 2018

in: Reviews

Dover Quartet: Musical Alchemy

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Dover Quartet satisfied an enthusiastic Celebrity Series crowd at Pickman Hall Wednesday with interpretations of the folk-influenced musical material ranging from stunning to amusing to downright thrilling.    [continued]

December 10, 2018

in: Reviews

Pinpoint Precision from Palestrina to Muhly

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Taking Palestrina as their standard bearer, Tallis Scholars regaled Harvard’s Memorial Church BEMF crowd on Friday with antiphonal symmetry even in program design.    [continued]

December 9, 2018

in: Reviews

The Variations United Are Indefatigable

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Saturday evening at Longy, the wide-ranging pianist Christopher Taylor effectively served up two of the larger thematic sets, from 1740 and 1975.    [continued]

December 8, 2018

in: Reviews

Messiah for the 18th and 21st Centuries

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In the auspicious year of 1812, some 76 years after its premiere in Dublin, and 51 years after the composer’s death, the Handel and Haydn Society introduced Handel’s Messiah to America. This weekend, Boston Baroque brings its 38th-annual HIP version to Jordan Hall.    [continued]

December 6, 2018

in: Reviews

Lutenist Succeeds With Diminutions

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Eight-course lutenist Hopkinson Smith reprised his Diapason d’Or-winning CD “Mad Dog” in a candlelight Cambridge Society for Early Music concert Monday evening at the Christ Church in Cambridge.    [continued]

December 5, 2018

in: Reviews

BMOP Features Frog, Two Cellos & Violin

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Gil Rose and Boston Modern Orchestra Project enlightened, stretched, and amused, and got  Friday’s Jordan Hall audience into “Trouble”    [continued]

December 3, 2018

in: Reviews

Refreshing Exactitude from H+ H

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Thanksgiving having passed, we heard a timely annual reminder of Who was born unto us in the year zero. Our most venerable singing society rais’d Messiah incorruptible three times at Symphony Hall over the weekend.    [continued]

December 3, 2018

in: Reviews

John Cage, Guitar?

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All the compositions on Aaron Larget-Caplan’s Saturday night concert at Arlington Street Church  came from the pen of the thorny master between 1933 and 1948. The eponymous Stone Records CD release party-concert included guest artists Sharan Leventhal, violin; and Adam Levin, guitar.    [continued]

December 2, 2018

in: Reviews

A Far Cry: Enthusiastically Mixed

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A Far Cry gave an imaginative selection of mostly transcribed pieces to a substantially populated and enthusiastic Calderwood Hall Saturday (and Sunday).    [continued]

December 2, 2018

in: Reviews

Chameleon Tells 100-year-old Tale

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The Chameleon Arts Ensemble under flutist-director Deborah Boldin honored the centenary of l’Histoire du soldat  in some interesting French company at First Church Boston last night. Repeats on Sunday, December 2, at four o’clock; don’t miss it!    [continued]

December 1, 2018

in: Reviews

Fire Bringers at Longy

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The Neave Trio (violinist Anna Williams, cellist Mikhail Veselov, and pianist Eri Nakamura) can be counted on to present interesting and varied repertoire, but Friday’s concert of Roussel, Shostakovitch, and Korngold at Longy particularly stood out.    [continued]

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January 15, 2019

in: News & Features

On Adapting The Scarlet Ibis

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The most frigid of times, January can also be the most florid of times for new opera in the Northeast. Hot on the heels of New York City’s PROTOTYPE Festival of new music-theater pieces, Boston Opera Collaborative is preparing to open its production of The Scarlet Ibis by David Cote and Stefan Weisman. This adaptation of a popular 1960 short story by James Hurst, a staple of many Minnesotan English curricula, taught in high schools from Rochester to Farmington to Mankato, also runs from Thursday through Sunday at Longy in Cambridge. Tickets HERE.

A tragic story of childhood and illness, The Scarlet Ibis has long fascinated readers. The operatic adaptation by Cote and Weisman first appeared at the 2015 PROTOTYPE Festival, and this year will be staged by both Boston Opera Collaborative and Chicago Opera Theater. Basil Considine spoke with librettist David Cote about adapting The Scarlet Ibis for the stage and walking the line between theater criticism and opera writing.

BC: How did your partnership first conceive of adapting James Hurst’s The Scarlet Ibis as an opera? [continued…]

January 14, 2019

in: News & Features

BMOP Mounts 12-Tone Take on Children’s Book

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The Boston premiere of Haroun and the Sea of Stories, Charles Wuorinen’s “an over-flowing feast of witty, inventive music-theater,” will take place Saturday night at Jordan Hall in the third installment of the Boston Modern Opera Project’s season as Gil Rose leads a semi-staged production featuring guest soprano Heather Buck. James Fenton derived his libretto from Salman Rushdie namesake novel. The result is a sophisticated, adult fantasy-opera based on an equivalently sophisticated children’s novel written by a man under a death sentence. “For those who want an opera of widely diverse dramatic character and complex music, this is for you,” says Gil Rose.

Bombay-born Salman Rushdie completed his first children’s novel, Haroun and the Sea of Stories, in 1990, while in hiding in England under an intentional assassination-sentence by Iran’s Ayatollah Khomeini for blasphemy to Islam in the author’s previous book. [continued…]

January 8, 2019

in: News & Features

A Far Cry Reflects on a Legacy

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Pamela Frank (file photo)

In advance of the Criers’ concert at Jordan Hall this Friday, violinist Jesse Irons reflects on a program that encompasses Tchaikovsky’s Andante Cantabile, Vivaldi’s: Concerto for 4 Violins in B minor, Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 4 in D Major, and Haydn: Symphony No. 44.

Some years ago, my dear Peabody Conservatory violin teacher Shirley Givens was excited that her star pupil Pamela Frank was coming to perform as soloist with the Baltimore Symphony. Givens had her ways, and she finagled the entire studio to attend a dress rehearsal where Pam performed the Beethoven Violin Concerto, followed by a chat. The stunning performance showcased Pam’s incredible ability to weave in and out of the orchestral textures: to soar above when needed, and to almost embed and strengthen the orchestra when the part called for it. It was an entirely egoless performance, all about Beethoven’s intention, and the music was fully alive and moving.

About a year later, Givens, planning to be away for the week, had arranged for a special guest teacher for her studio. I was extremely nervous for what would be my first lesson with Pam, but I pulled out Mozart’s Violin Concerto in D Major No. Four. I remember playing through the first movement and being out of breath. Pam asked, with a smile, “how do you feel?” Tired, I said. Pam looked at me and said, “You better not be tired, you have two more movements to play!” I was instantly smitten. After the lesson, I bought her recording of the Mozart violin concertos and I’ve probably listened to her recording of the fourth 100 times. In fact, I used to tune my violin to it! [continued…]

January 1, 2019

in: News & Features

Helen, thy beauty is to me….

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Helen of Troy by Rossetti

Odyssey Opera continues its sixth season next month at the Huntington Theater with the Boston premiere of Gluck’s (1770) Paride ed Elena to Ranieri de’ Calzabigi’s libretto. This marks the first of three works to be performed in Winter/Spring 2019 inspired by one of the most enigmatic figures in ancient history, Helen of Troy. The company tells us that Paride ed Elena (Paris and Helen) will feature three leading female roles performed by Mireille Asselin (Elena), Meghan Lindsay (Paride), and Erica Schuller (Amor), with orchestra and chorus conducted by Gil Rose, and stage direction by Crystal Manich (Pittsburgh Opera, Utah Opera).  The fully-staged, five-act production will be sung in Italian with English subtitles.

Paride ed Elena was the third and last of the so-called “reform” operas on which Gluck collaborated with the librettist Ranieri de’ Calzabigi. According to Gil Rose, Odyssey Opera’s Artistic and General Director, “Paride ed Elena is yet another operatic gem that has disappeared from the canon. The ‘why’ remains a mystery as this opera has something for everyone: a passionate love story, glorious orchestral textures, sensual ballets, and the sumptuous melodies that we’ve come to expect from Gluck’s masterful vocal writing. Odyssey Opera is thrilled to revive this neglected work and introduce it to Boston audiences.” [continued…]

December 5, 2018

in: News & Features

Interesting and Unusual Opera CD Suggestions

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Last year in this space [HERE] I offered an overview of more than a dozen fascinating new CD releases of opera recordings, ending with detailed reviews of two additional operas: by Bellini and by English composer John Joubert. My feature stirred up some lively comments.

During 2018 the harvest has been even more astounding. Whether you are new to the world of opera listening or have great familiarity with the repertoire, you are bound to find something for your taste, or to give as a gift to someone who loves music, theater, or the singing voice.

I divide the pile of discs into several rough categories, for convenience: 1) relatively well-known works that have been recorded many times; 2) a handful of valuable Mozart recordings from different points in his career; 3) lesser-known works by well-known composers; 4) Baroque and Classic-era works done in some version of Historically Informed Performance style; 5) forgotten French works from the 19th century that have now been given first recordings, in superb performances; and 6) other forgotten works that turn out to be quite interesting, most of them, too, in expert performances that play to a work’s strengths.

Well-Known Works, Often Seen in a New Light [continued…]

December 3, 2018

in: News & Features

Camerata Seasonal Renaissance Music: Legendary & Hot

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The Green Mountain Man

Ever ready to assist in the marketing activities of our literate and resourceful presenters, we herewith take note of the potential Gloire, Sororité and Fraternité in Boston Camerata’s five forthcoming holiday concerts.

Artistic Director Anne  announces that she is pleased this year, to be unveiling a brand-new production, full of color and sweep. “Gloria: An Italian Christmas” will feature six vocal soloists, harp, lutes, gambas, organ, cornetto, sackbuts, and choir, performing some of the hottest music of the late Renaissance and early Baroque. Some cast members, like bass singer-lutenist Joel Frederiksen, and the legendary cornettist Bruce Dickey, are coming over from Europe to participate. We are also happy to welcome students from the Longy School of Music of Bard College. Such an adventure for us…

FLE:  Yes, there are performers and hot music involved, but what about composers?

We’ll be featuring the titanic Gabrieli and Monteverdi along with a plethora from the Renaissance A-list: Marenzio, Cipriano, Willaert, and others. And, to keep the Camerata tradition alive, there will be Christmas songs from country chapels and popular sources. We found a cache of these simple, beautiful carol melodies in a Florentine print of the 17th century, transcribed some of them, and will be premiering them for modern audiences, alongside the magnificent sound structures meant for San Marco in Venice, and other major-league places.

The Camerata has also an extensive repertory book of Christmas concerts, and you are continuing to share it with the public. When did this all begin for you? [continued…]

November 28, 2018

in: News & Features

Marvin’s Ninth Inning

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In 2010, following his retirement after 32 years as Director of Choral Activities at Harvard University, Jameson (Jim) Marvin founded the Jameson Singers, an SATB choir of some 70 voices, which draws  experienced amateur singers across Boston (and includes many of Marvin’s former Harvard students). The ensemble’s 9th season will be Marvin’s final one. Exuberant and witty, Marvin discusses, among other things, the season to come: “Wondrous Light” holiday concerts on December 1st and 8th featuring works from early Renaissance to the present day (including some of Marvin’s own compositions and arrangements) and next May’s performance of the mighty German Requiem by Brahms.

GL: In your forthcoming book “Emotion in Choral Singing: Reading Between the Notes” (which will be released December 12th!) you write I believe choral music has the power to draw us into a spiritual realm, a transcendence that allows a fleeting moment of peace.” This is quite the statement!

JM It seems to me there’s a reason for choral music, a real purpose. And, simply put, it is easier to express emotion with text and singing. Of course instrumental music also has the great power to express emotion, but I find that the inclusion of text and the use of the human voice allows choral music to lift us out of our everyday experience. I believe strongly in that mission – an experience so momentary and yet so valuable. We are singing to inspire and also, to an extent, to educate. We are blessed as human beings to have the capacity to express emotion through singing or through music period. And I think humanity needs that.

Singing to educate…do you see yourself primarily as an educator? [continued…]

November 26, 2018

in: News & Features

MIT Announces Major Gift for Music Facility

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Will Frank Gehry be invited back?

Finding the money and the will to build a major building for the musical arts at Massachusetts’s most famous technical institute has been bruited about for more than 50 years. With the announcement that Joyce Linde, a longtime supporter of MIT and the arts, has made a “cornerstone gift” to enable building a new “state-of-the-art” music facility, that hurdle now seems overcome. The yet-to-be designed building must accommodate the current and future needs of the considerable and growing program. That there is such popular support of musical arts in various forms will come as a surprise to many, and the Joyce Linde commitment represents the beginning of an unfolding story.

The new building will stand between two illustrious neighbors. The Finnish architect and designer Alvar Aalto drew plans for the serpentine red-brick Baker House Dormitory when he was a professor in residence at the Institute in 1948, as one of but a few structures he built in America after the Finish Pavilion at the 1939 New York Worlds Fair. Eero Saarinen’s 1955 Kresge complex made a radical statement of form and material. A building committee will eventually name a signature architect worthy of this prime location.

“Our campus hums with MIT people making music, from formal lessons, recitals, and performances, to the beautiful surprise of stumbling on an impromptu rehearsal in the Main Lobby after hours,” says L. Rafael Reif, president of MIT. “Now, through a wonderful act of vision and generosity, Joyce Linde has given us the power to create a central home for faculty and students who make and study music at MIT — a first-class venue worthy of their incredible talent and aspirations. As a champion of the arts, Joyce knows the incomparable power of music to inspire, provoke, challenge, delight, console, and unify. I have no doubt the new building she has made possible will amplify the positive power of music in the life of MIT.” [continued…]

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